James D. Faix, MD

An older man wearing glasses, with blue shirt and yellow tieJames D. Faix, MD is a pathologist with interest and expertise in both clinical chemistry and clinical immunology. After receiving his medical degree from Hahnemann (now Drexel University) Medical College, he trained in Anatomic & Clinical Pathology at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston MA and also completed a fellowship in Clinical Immunology there. He worked at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston before moving to Stanford University School of Medicine in Palo Alto CA where he served as Director of Clinical Chemistry & Immunology for many years. More recently, he had similar responsibilities at Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx NY. Beginning in July, he will be Medical Director of Immunology at Quest Diagnostics in San Juan Capistrano CA.

Although he has always viewed his management of a wide range of clinical testing for patient care as his primary responsibility, he developed special interest in endocrinology and autoimmune disorders, especially thyroid disease. For many years, he participated in the effort initiated by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine to standardize thyroid function testing. The other focus of his career has been supporting the field of laboratory medicine, especially Clinical Chemistry. He has had significant volunteer activities over the years in both the College of American Pathologists (Council for Scientific Affairs; Chemistry, Special Chemistry, and Diagnostic Immunology Resource Committees; Standards Committee) and the Association for Diagnostics & Laboratory Medicine (formerly AACC) (Board of Directors; leadership in several divisions and local sections; annual meeting task forces and organizing committees). For both organizations, his goals have included enhancing member involvement, recognition of the importance of laboratory testing, and the development of teaching materials for medical students, residents and fellows, and practicing laboratorians.

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